The Privatization of Public Education

Posted by SPMG Media on July 16, 2013 under Academic Achievement Gap, Education Leadership, Educational Policy, Educational Reform, Multiple Pathways to Education, News, Research Corner | Be the First to Comment

972145_501645923242202_724306697_n`
The Common Core/Standardized Testing regime, justified to make the US economy more competitive internationally, has marginalized the Arts, Social Studies/Civics, Phys. Ed, recess/free play and extracurricular activities. Yet, those are the sources of most of the well rounded, innovative graduates business leaders say they desperately need. Education reform only makes sense as a business strategy but educationally, it is wasting the opportunities of children by the scores of millions, and, if continued, will create a generation of shadow citizens.
Tears for Fears, Everybody Wants to Rule the World (music video) Tears For Fears Everybody Wants To Rule The World With Lyrics

Dr. Chris L. Hickey, Sr. Attends the 5th Annual Black Male Think Tank

Posted by SPMG Media on May 17, 2013 under Community Influence on Education, Education Leadership, Educational Reform, Leadership, Mentoring Youth, National Policy, News | Be the First to Comment

969091_517674414934703_522728863_n  310081_517673328268145_125145664_n

Dr. Hickey (pictured here with Tyrone Howard, Executive Director, UCLA Black Male Institute) recently attended the 5th Annual Black Male Think Tank, hosted by the Los Angeles Urban League, UCLA Black Male Institute and the California Community Foundation, Thursday, May 9, 2013.

The theme of this years’ event was ‘Solutions Not Suspensions’. This event was billed as a collaborative effort to promote positive behavioral interventions and supports. The goal of this event was to:

  • Highlight best practices, programs and policies that reduce punitive school discipline practices and policies
  • To facilitate dialogue and collaboration across various sectors in order to accelerate efforts that reduce school discipline
  • To establish ongoing collaborative connections between multiple sectors to reduce school discipline.

249180_517674564934688_283865681_n942786_517674394934705_1075374512_n947297_517673844934760_1745778110_n969561_517675958267882_143246415_n

Believe Foundation Makes its Case for Arts Education in Urban Schools

Posted by Chris L. Hickey, Sr on July 9, 2012 under Academic Achievement Gap, Community Action, Education Leadership, Educational Reform, Leadership, News | Be the First to Comment

Gregory Smith, Executive Director of Believe Foundation

LOS ANGELES – (June 28, 2012) — The development team of the Los Angeles School of Arts & Entertainment (LASAE) has made its case before the Inglewood Unified School District (IUSD). A collection of educators, parents, and some of the most important names in the entertainment industry, the team made a well-informed and passionate plea for arts education Wednesday, June 27 at the IUSD board meeting. A project of the Believe Foundation, LASAE is a proposed college preparatory 6th through 12th grade charter school that seeks to be a catalyst for the restoration of high quality arts education in urban America. As part of the California Education Code, the IUSD Board of Education now has 30 days to either approve or deny the charter petition. If the petition is successful, the development team anticipates an enrollment of 360 students with classes starting in the fall of 2013.

“The Los Angeles School of Arts and Entertainment is a direct response to draconian cuts in arts education in Los Angeles and throughout California,” said development team member Dr. Aresa A. Allen, a professor for the University of Southern California’s Rossier School of Education and principal for the Los Angeles Unified School District. Since 2008 the Los Angeles Unified School District has cuts arts education by more than 80% and recently proposed to end elementary arts education completely.

These cuts come despite clear evidence showing that students immersed in a long-term, arts rich environment outperformed their “arts poor” counterparts by 46% on standardized tests across all academic disciplines (e.g. English, Mathematics, Science, History, etc.).

Similarly, low income high school seniors with a long-term involvement in band or orchestra are twice as likely to score highly proficient in math (33%) as their non music counterparts (15.5%). Research also indicates that low income students with substantial involvement in the arts are:

• 4 times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement
• 3 times more likely to be elected to class office within their schools
• 4 times more likely to participate in a math and science fair
• 3 times more likely to win an award for school attendance
• 4 times more likely to win an award for writing an essay or poem

Because students can cross district lines to attend a charter school, LASAE will be a magnet for all students desiring an arts-centered college preparatory education. “We already have more than 300 signatures from parents from throughout the L.A. County affirming their interest in enrolling their children at LASAE” said, TJ Stafford, Board Secretary for the Believe Foundation. These signatures were part of the completed petition that was submitted to IUSD.

Supporters of the project

The mission of the LASAE is to use high quality arts education to improve student achievement and to prepare its graduates for success in college and/or employment opportunities in the creative economy. Serving grades 6th through 12th, the LASAE will offer a standards‐based college preparatory curriculum and high-level instruction in music, dance, drama, and the visual and media arts.

“There is a critical need for the restoration of arts education in urban America,” said Charles Ragins, also a member of the development team and 2010 Emmy Award Winner for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Animation (The Simpsons). “Its about time we began reinvesting in the arts and reinvesting in our children.”

During the public hearing Ragins was joined by fellow LASAE development team member Michael Bearden, Michael Jackson’s former music director. “When I think about where the arts have taken me in my career, I want that same opportunity for every student regardless of their race, income or geography.”

LASAE will prepare students for college and future employment by requiring all graduates to complete the CSU/UC admissions requirements along with at least 200 total hours of work experience in the arts. Informed by an advisory board made up of educators, scholars, artists and entertainment industry professionals, students will also be given every opportunity to create academic, professional and personal relationships that will be of great benefit long after they graduate.

Founded by long-time community arts educator and advocate Gregory C. Smith, the development team of LASAE includes; architect Phillip H. Cotton; educational specialists Tommie Watkins, Casaundra McNair (Moreno Valley Unified School District), Mindy Coates Smith (Director of Youth Discipleship, Bel Air Presbyterian Church); Chris L. Hickey Sr. (Each One-Teach One), Kevin Eddington, Dr. Michael Baslee (Pepperdine School of Education), Bonnie Tillotson (Former Head of Visual and Performing Arts, San Bernardino County Board of Education) and Dr. Aresa Allen (Rossier School of Education—USC). Team members from the fields of arts and entertainment include; Charles Ragins, 2010 Emmy Award Winner for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Animation (The Simpsons), Michael Bearden, former music director for Michael Jackson, Jennifer Lopez, and Madonna; Rickerby Hinds, Professor of Playwriting at the University of California, Riverside; Erick Tran of The Simpsons; Jae Deal, Assistant Music Director for Janet Jackson; T.J. Stafford, lead singer Uncle Daddy, Grammy Winner Jeffe Weber; and Sean Holt, formerly of Lopez Tonight and music director of Queen Latifah’s new singing competition show The Next staring Gloria Estefan, John Rich, and Nelly. Major media outlets and community organizations that have committed support to the project include 100.3 The Sound Radio, BLU Educational Foundation, and the 10,000-member Faithful Central Bible Church.

About Believe Foundation
Founded by Gregory C. Smith, a long-time community arts educator, Believe Foundation is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation that provides high quality arts programming to underserved communities. Emphasizing the universal appeal of great art, the organization seeks to inspire inner-city youth to become the artists and audiences of the future. For more information, visit www.believefoundationusa.org or http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MtQvlmPa48.

Each One – Teach One Executive Director to Present at Black Child Conference/Scholarship Luncheon

Posted by Chris L. Hickey, Sr on May 11, 2011 under Achievement Gap Events, Educational Reform, Educational Technology, Educational Technology Events, Multiple Pathways to Education, Research Corner | Be the First to Comment

Each One - Teach One Alliance Executive Director

Each One - Teach One Alliance Executive Director

On June 4th, 2011 Chris L. Hickey, Sr., the Executive Director of Each One – Teach One Alliance for Academic Access, Achievement and Success will be presenting a workshop at the Council of Black Administrators’ (COBA) 36th Annual Black Child Conference/Scholarship Luncheon, in Los Angeles. The Conference Theme is: “Quality First Teaching: The Key to Academic Success for the African-American Child.” My presentation topic is, “Understanding the iGeneration: The New Science of Learning.” In the workshop teachers, parents and caretakers explore and share perspectives relevant to the new science of the brain, learning and cognition. The focus of this workshop is on how classroom instruction can be strategically aligned, at home, with how iGeneration students learn. Participants are presented with ground breaking research that challenge traditional notions of how students spend their (multi-tasking) time, direct their (creative) attention, and are inspired (motivated) to learn. Specific attention is given to how the staggering global proliferation of cell phones, IPads, digital social networks, eBooks, video games, Wikis, Wiis, email, texting, IMing, MP3 players, IPods, PS3s, personal computers, Xboxes, etc., are affecting the nature and cognitive process of learning.

For more information on the conference visit:

http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/orgs/coba/index.html

Each One – Teach One Executive Director to Present at Dream Deferred Conference

Posted by Chris L. Hickey, Sr on February 24, 2011 under Academic Achievement Gap, Educational Reform, Educational Technology, Leadership, Multiple Pathways to Education | Be the First to Comment

On April 11th - 12th, 2011 Chris L. Hickey, Sr., the Executive Director of Each One – Teach One Alliance for Academic Access, Achievement and Success will be presenting a workshop at the College Board Dream Deferred National Conference in Philadelphia, Penn. The Conference Theme is: The Future of African American Education. The presentation topic is: Understanding the iGeneration: The New Science of Learning. “In this workshop parents and caretakers explore and share perspectives relevant to the new science of the brain, learning and cognition. The focus of this workshop is on how classroom instruction can be strategically aligned, at home, with how iGeneration students learn. Participants are presented with ground breaking research that challenge traditional notions of how students spend their (multi-tasking) time, direct their (creative) attention, and are inspired (motivated) to learn. Specific attention is given to how the staggering global proliferation of cell phones, IPads, digital social networks, eBooks, video games, Wikis, Wiis, email, texting, IMing, MP3 players, IPods, PS3s, personal computers, Xboxes, etc., are affecting the nature and cognitive process of learning.”

For more information on the conference visit:

http://www.collegeboard.com/dreamdeferred/index.html

Announcing the 2010 Western Regional Council on Educating Black Children Leadership Summit

Posted by WRCEBC on August 28, 2009 under Academic Achievement Gap, Achievement Gap Events, Community Action, Community Influence on Education, Education Is A Civil Right, Educational Policy, Educational Reform, Educational Technology Events, Leadership, Mentoring Youth, Multiple Pathways to Education, Parent Involvement | Be the First to Comment

The Western Regional Council on Educating Black Children (WRCEBC), in collaboration with the Council of Black Administrators (COBA), the Urban League, the NAACP, and the Education is A Civil Right Committee  (ECRC) will host the 14th Annual Leadership Summit on Thursday, March 4 through Saturday, March 6, 2010, at the Westin Hotel & Resorts, 5400 W. Century Blvd., Los Angeles CA 90045. The theme of the 2010 Leadership Summit is:

Demanding Excellence for African American Children…
Through a Leadership Summit for Change:
“Implementing the Blueprint for Action – Phase XIII”

More than 50 years after Brown v. Board of Education equal educational opportunities are still denied. The object of this Summit is to produce a comprehensive, sustainable PLAN OF ACTION that all individuals, organization, and stakeholder groups will implement in their local schools, districts, states and nationally to prevent the calamity resulting from failing to educate Black youth.

Parents, teachers, paraprofessionals, administrators, policymakers, members of the religious community, business leaders and support service providers will conduct workshops and engage in developing action plans for implementing the Blueprint for Action – Phase XIII, with particular emphasis on the conference theme.

Colleagues from the nine states of the Western Region (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington) are teaming with us in planning and coordinating this event.

For additional information, please contact:

Chris L. Hickey, Sr.
(866) 614-9847
chickey@4itsc.com
or
http://www.wrcebc.org

Together, we will make a difference!

African American Leaders meet to discuss Public School choice at Los Angeles Unified School District

Posted by Chris L. Hickey, Sr on August 21, 2009 under Education Is A Civil Right, Educational Reform | Be the First to Comment

On August 20th, 2009 an impressive contingency of prominent African American leaders gathered at the field office of Los Angeles Unified School Board member Marguerite Poindexter LaMotte to discuss strategies to amend a board motion that would allow the district to “…invite operational and instructional plans from internal and external stakeholders, such as school planning teams, local communities, pilot school operators, labor partners, charter, and others who are interested in collaborating with the District or operating the District’s new schools, in an effort to create more schools of choice and educational options for District’s students and families…” Introduced by board member Yolie Flores Reyes-Aguilar, the “Public School Choice: A New Way for LAUSD” resolution will calls for the district’s Innovation and Charter Schools Division to carry out and implement the plan.

Included among the leaders in attendance were representatives from the Western Regional Council on Educating Black Children, Council of Black Administrators, National Alliance of Black School Administrators, NAACP, Voices for African American Students, Inc., Parent Revolution, and others.

The discussion primarily centered around objections to the resolution and support for amendments to the resolution. Among the stated objections are that the resolution does not: “…address how the identified newly-built or existing schools will improve student retention, graduation, and college-going rates; develop a reauthorization process for operators of newly-built and existing schools that is based on regular performance evaluations; specify that all plans “…must include attention to collective bargaining agreements; and, insure that the process establishes “…a more inclusive list of community partners.”  Board Member LaMotte will be introducing amendments to the resolution on August 25th that addresses these concerns.

The group was adamant about the reality that for these amendments to be taken seriously by the School Board, there is a necessity that there are a large number of attendees at the board meeting showing support for the amendments.

KnowledgeWorks and New Technology Foundations Join Forces to Transform Approach to High School Education in the U.S.

Posted by Chris L. Hickey, Sr on March 9, 2009 under Educational Policy, Educational Reform, Educational Technology, Leadership | Read the First Comment

KnowledgeWorks Foundation Commits $10 Million and Expertise over Four Years to Support Expansion of Promising New Tech High Schools

Former AOL CEO Barry Schuler to Head National New Tech Board

INDIANAPOLIS–(BUSINESS WIRE)–KnowledgeWorks Foundation, a national public education philanthropy, announced today a strategic partnership with New Technology Foundation (New Tech), an organization that has pioneered an approach to collaborative, technology-based learning and teaching designed to give students the knowledge and skills they need to compete in the Information Age. Barry Schuler, former CEO of AOL, was appointed as Chairman of the Board of New Tech Foundation.

“Our primary objective at KnowledgeWorks is to drive innovation in public education, and we believe that New Tech is the best-in-class, most highly-scalable approach to learning in the 21st century that we have seen,” said Chad Wick, CEO of KnowledgeWorks.

“We’re thrilled to have KnowledgeWorks and Barry on board to help us rapidly grow the New Tech network,” said Susan Schilling, CEO of New Technology Foundation. “Developing our nation’s next set of leaders who come into adulthood with the ability to find and analyze information, solve problems, communicate solutions, and implement them has never been of greater importance.”

This announcement was made together with Governor Mitch Daniels in Indiana (see video), where six New Tech schools currently operate and more than 22 schools are working toward implementation for 2009 and beyond. Indiana’s successful work with New Tech high schools in partnership with the Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning at the University of Indianapolis, business and economic leaders, and community stakeholders has become a strong model for linking high school education to economic development and was a key driver in KnowledgeWorks’ decision to invest in New Tech.

As part of this partnership, KnowledgeWorks will provide up to $10 million to New Tech over a four year period, along with operational guidance and strategic expertise, to help develop the infrastructure necessary to support the rapidly growing network of New Tech schools. The management teams have already begun working together over the past nine months, with a focus on operations and further developing New Tech’s technology platform.

Barry Schuler, former CEO of America Online, known for leading the AOL team that simplified the online service provider’s user interface, making it possible for millions of consumers to gain easy access to the Internet, will bring a vast amount of technology management experience to his position as Chairman of the Board.

Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal on Education

Posted by Chris L. Hickey, Sr on February 24, 2009 under Academic Achievement Gap, Education Is A Civil Right, Educational Reform | Be the First to Comment

In the Republican response to President Barack Obama’s Speech to Congress, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal contributed affirmatively on the significant importance of education for all our children, in strengthening the economy and the moral fabric of our country. Mr. Jindal states, “To strengthen our economy, we also need to make sure every child in America gets the best possible education.” He goes on the use New Orleans as an example of how government and community can work together to affect change. He adds,  ”After Katrina, we reinvented the New Orleans school system, opening dozens of new charter schools, and creating a new scholarship program that is giving parents the chance to send their children to private or parochial schools of their choice. We believe that, with the proper education, the children of America can do anything.”

 

Weighs in on Education

Weighs in on Education

 No one can argue against the position that a proper education allows for children to make their dreams come true. Both Govenor Jindal and President Obama are gleemering testaments of this fact. I am particularly appreciative of the Governor’s admonishment that we need not wait until a debilitating catastrophe before the government acts upon the need to improve educational opportunities for all our county’s children. He resounds, “And it shouldn’t take a devastating storm to bring this kind of innovation to education in our country.” I share in the Governors call for innovation with respect to realizing true academic access, achievement and success for all children.

http://e1t1.org

President Barack Obama’s Address to Congress

Posted by Chris L. Hickey, Sr on under Academic Achievement Gap, Education Is A Civil Right, Educational Reform | Be the First to Comment

Speaking to Congress

Speaking to Congress

In tonight’s historic Address to Congress by Barack Obama, the President outlined three major areas of concern for his administration, and challenged the congress to join him is resolving. He states, “…the budget I submit will invest in the three areas that are absolutely critical to our economic future: energy, health care, and education.” Of notable relevance to this blog, the President’s educational agenda gleams prominent.
Obama established a clear and unambiguous premise with respect to the significance education plays in the well being of our nation and its children. He notes, “In a global economy where the most valuable skill you can sell is your knowledge, a good education is no longer just a pathway to opportunity — it is a pre-requisite.” He elaborates, “Right now, three-quarters of the fastest-growing occupations require more than a high school diploma. And yet, just over half of our citizens have that level of education. We have one of the highest high school dropout rates of any industrialized nation. And half of the students who begin college never finish.”
I particularly appreciate the relationship between education and patriotism suggested by the President. Of our current educational condition he declares, “This is a prescription for economic decline, because we know the countries that out-teach us today will out-compete us tomorrow.” Given the relationship suggested by the President, it is easy to argue for state legislation that addresses the challenge for closing the achievement gap that exist in far too many public school districts throughout the country.
I believe we must all do our part, not just in words but in deed, in making a personal commitment to be actively involved in contributing to the enhancement of academic access, achievement and success. President Barack Obama shares his commitment as such: “…it will be the goal of this administration to ensure that every child has access to a complete and competitive education — from the day they are born to the day they begin a career.”
http://e1t1.org